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Overview

The Department is in the School of Environmental Sciences of the Faculty of Applied and Natural Sciences. The Department addresses the professional concerns of Urban and Regional Planning, linking knowledge and action in ways that improve public and private development decisions which affect people, places and the environment with a departmental focus on medium sized centres and rural development. These we do without neglecting to teach the core elements of urban and regional planning.

The restructured courses at the Department focus on a theoretical understanding of urban, regional and rural planning, practical and technical links with both urban and metropolitan areas, the immediate countryside and small town environments as the laboratories for study and studio exercises. The Department also maintains links with active professional planners in both public and private sectors through the regional chapter of the South African Planning Institute (SAPI).

Vision

To be premier academy of professional training and research in the field of Urban and Regional Planning in the Limpopo and South Africa.

Mission

Deliver knowledge and inculcate skills in urban and regional planning to achieve excellence in academic learning, innovation in research and publication, and in the critical engagement of community and society in redressing the disadvantages, inequities and imbalances of past development.

Teaching

To provide future urban and regional planning practitioners the knowledge, practical skills, and values to enable them to become effective, and to improve the quality of places and regions.

Research

To conduct and disseminate research on the "theory and practice" of urban and regional planning and to assist society to plan for more equitable and sustainable communities.

Outreach and Public Service

To address community problems by linking knowledge and practice by facilitating mutual learning between community and university.

An Integrated Approach

Planning encompasses both the natural environment and the human and built environment to improve our communities and our landscape.

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers courses / modules leading to the following qualifications.

  • B.URP. Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning Degree. This is a four year full-time professional planning programme ;
  • B.EnvSc . A three year Bachelor of Environmental Sciences with Planning as one of the major options.
  • B.EnvSc (Hons URP). A one year professional degree course for those who have successfully completed the first three years in the BURP Professional Programme or its equivalent.
  • *(BEHURP (Hons Planning). A one year Professional Degree Course for those who have completed the equivalent of the BURP professional programme)*.
  • M.URP. (Master Urban and Regional Planning). A two-year full time Professional Degree Programme for graduates of Environmental Sciences; The Built Environment, Economic and Management Sciences; Social and Behavioral Sciences, and other relevant disciplines or equivalent training.
  • M. Env Sc. (Master of Environmental Science in Urban & Regional Planning). A one-year full time or two-year part time research degree for holders of a Professional Planning Degree.
  • Ph. D. A program of a minimum duration of two years.
  • Certificate and Diploma or Postgraduate Diploma / Certificates.

Undergraduate Planning Courses in the School of Environmental Sciences have been on offer since 1996. The first graduates with a major in Urban and Regional Planning came out in 1998. The four-year programme started in 1997 and the first students completed the programme in March 2001.

Expected Outcomes

The detailed modules and expected competencies are an outcome of inputs from guidelines for the Town Planning profession by the South African Council for Town and Regional Planning (SACTRP).

The following critical skills are embedded and underpin all the critical outcomes:

  • Problem definition, gathering information and proffering alternatives and collaborative problem solving.
  • Written, oral and graphic communications.
  • Understanding strategic and synoptic dimensions and the interconnections between different facets of planning.
  • Aesthetic dimensions and design awareness.
  • The use of information technology (CAD, GIS and the use of the Internet among others).

Furthermore, that the knowledge of a planner must encompass a sound theoretical and applied base of the following areas:

  • The nature, purpose and method of planning.
  • The environment and development.
  • The political and institutional context of planning.

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning has taken into consideration and adopted the above SACTRP discussion guidelines in the new course modules presented in the following pages.

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers the following modules:

URP 1541: Introduction to Society and Planning
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students; open to qualifying students in the school.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 contact hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
Fulfillment of Departmental Admission Requirements as Stipulated in University Calendar.
Core-requisites
1542
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • (i) Individual Assignments,
  • (ii) Tests and
  • (iii) Group Assignments.

2. A Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be aware of the following:

  • (i) The diversity of cultures, space, networks views and ideologies,
  • (ii) The need for an environmentally sensitive orientation to planning,
  • (iii) A people oriented approach top planning.
Module Content
Meaning of planning, planning typologies and related disciplines. Basic sociological concepts; cultural norms and values. Social change and development. Human settlement; people, resources and networks. Urbanization; definitions and conceptualization, urban development in Southern Africa. The planner and society, urban and regional development theories. Understanding planning as social and political process. Planners and plans, Planner as technocrat, advocate, educator, co-ordinator, mediator and social scientist. Participation in the planning process. Planning responses to urban and rural conditions in Africa.

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URP 1641: Principles and Techniques of Planning
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students; open to qualifiying students in the school.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 contact hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
Fulfillment of Departmental Admission Requirements as Stipulated in University Calendar.
Core-requisites
URP 1642
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • (i) Individual Assignments,
  • (ii) Tests and
  • (iii) Group Assignments.

2. A Written Semester Examination

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to understand and apply the following:

  • (i) Link the knowledge acquired to social, economic and spatial policies to plans,
  • (ii) Be aware of the three spheres of planning, in addition to political, institutional and techniques of planning.
  • (iii Be able to understand the techniques for gathering and presenting site and user data
  • (v) Understand the techniques for evaluating site potentials.
Module Content
Origins of planning, urbanisation, economic development and the environment, urban/rural linkages. Urban trends, change and socio-political transformations. Evolution of planning principles, standards and concerns. Method of social, economic, and physical planning surveys, analytical and procedural techniques in the planning process. Quantitative, cartographic and planning graphics.

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URP 1543: Settlement Forms and Urban History
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
Fulfillment of Departmental Admission Requirements as Stipulated in University Calendar.
Core-requisites
URP 1541
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests and
  • Group Assignments.
Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to:

  • (i) Link knowledge to spatial policies and plans
  • (ii) Be aware of evolution of settlements in environmental planning
  • (iii) Be aware of the political, legislative, environmental and institutional context of planning
  • (iv) Sensitivity to the role of the public, politicians, and planners in the field of planning.
  • (v) Appreciate the roles played by utopians and the role of history/epoque in the evolution of built-up areas
Module Content
History of settlement and urban forms and the influences of settlement design and planning in different socio-political economic and geographical contexts. Visions of Utopian cities and settlement patterns; treatment of public and private space and functional relationships between organisation of space and social structure.

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URP 1643: Mathematics for Planners
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 1542
Core-requisites
URP 1641
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests and
  • Group Assignments
Module Outcomes
  • Strengthen the quantitative skills of new entrants. Appreciation of those areas of planning in which quantitative methods are appropriate and useful.
  • Understand the use and value of information in planning, policy analysis and decision-making situations.
  • Become familiar with basic sources of Census of Population and Housing data used in planning practice.
  • Explore concepts of model building including model specification, parameter estimation, and interpretation of results.
  • Provide a foundation for plan and program evaluation through the introduction of Policy Analysis, Program analysis, Benefit-Cost analysis and similar techniques.
  • Review basic quantitative skills (computation, problem structuring, table interpretation, algebra, etc.)
  • Develop a working skill with probability concepts and basic statistical methods.
  • Develop a working skill with Excel spreadsheets.
Module Content
Basic concepts in mensuration, trigonometry; geometry, linear and matrix algebra; population growth models. Descriptive statistics: sampling and collection of data, frequency distributions and graphical representations. Descriptive measures of location and dispersion. Probability and inference and statistical distributions. Sampling frames, techniques and distributions. Estimation theory and hypothesis testing of sampling averages and proportions.

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URP 2543: Introduction to Urban Planning
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students; open to other qualifying students in the school.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 1541
Core-requisites
URP 2542
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests and
  • Group Assignments

2. A Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to;

  • Understand urban development concepts and dynamics and the variety and forms of interventions for sustainable urban development.
  • Undertake investigations, analysis and synthesize studies in order to contribute to the preparation and design of plans, formulation of policies within a spatial orientation for implementation .
  • Be aware of environmental sensitivity.
Module Content
Historical contexts of urbanisation (pre-industrial, industrial and post-industrial periods and planning concepts and practices derived there from. Theories of urban growth (Chicago ecological school) and the urban economy (urban land market). Utopian/ideal city, Garden Cities, New towns, neighbourhood concept, smart growth concept, regeneration and redevelopment. Controls versus facilitation. Integrated approach to development planning.

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URP 2641 : Rural and Regional Planning
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students; open to other qualifying students in the School.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 1641
Core-requisites
URP 2642 and URP 2643
Assessments

1. Continuous assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests and
  • Group Assignments.

2. A Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module students will be able to;

  • (i) Link specific knowledge to spatial plans and policies.
  • (ii) Be aware of the role of the political and institutional context of planning.
  • (iii) Relate spatial development theory to rural and regional development policy and practice.
Module Content

The scope of regional and rural planning. History of regional planning in developed and developing economies. Theoretical bases for regional and rural development. Regional planning strategies in Africa and SADC: growth centres and points, rural service centres river basin management, SDI, ISRDPs...

Theories of land value in land use planning and development. Urban land economics and markets , property markets, urban development. Planning issues and activities related to economics and financing of public and private projects. Land service and delivery systems. How planning interventions or (lack thereof) influence land markets and economics. Processes in the zone of transition (densification and internal re-organisation) and rural-urban fringe.

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URP 2644 : Planning for Infrastructure Development(Studio)
Status
Compulsory to all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 contact hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 1641
Core-requisites
URP 2542
Assessments

1. Continuous assessment based on:

  • (i) Individual Assignments,
  • (ii) Tests and
  • (iii) Group Assignments.

2. A written semester examination

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to do the following:

  • (i) Link knowledge to spatial policies, basic infrastructure and plans,
  • (ii) Be able to develop criteria for design of basic infrastructure in the spatial context of planning,
  • (iii) Be aware of the role of basic physical and line infrastructure in settlement areas.
Module Content

Deriving design criteria and standards for the provision of basic physical and line infrastructure for different land use configurations and densities i.e. free-hand and automated design .. This includes aspects of municipal engineering in relation to supply, reticulation and maintenance of water, storm-water drainage, electricity, sewerage and roads.

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URP 3645: Computers in Planning (Studio)
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 contact hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 2642
Core-requisites
URP 3542
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • (i) Individual Assignments,
  • (ii) Tests and
  • (iii) Group Assignments

2. A Written Semester Examination

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to understand and apply the following:

  • (i) To operate a CAD,
  • (ii) Critically evaluate and analyze the raw data for the preparation of plans in the computer,
  • (iii) To convert the information from the research into cadastral data,
  • (iv) To store, retrieve, export, import and be able to present the data in different forms.
Module Content

Planning data base concepts: structure, creating data bases, data entry and editing. Importing data-base from other applications. Spread sheet basics; making tables and graphics (Excel, SPSS)). Adding pictures and to texts. Computer-based techniques for mapping and analysis of spatial data (GIS). CAD applications in planning. Planning projects.

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URP 3644: Planning Law
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students; open to other qualifying students in the school.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3541
Core-requisites
URP 3642 and URP 3643
Assessments

1. Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests and
  • Group Assignments.

2. A Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to;

  • Understand the moral and ethical framework for planning.
  • Apply knowledge of institutional and political context of planning to planning legislation and procedures.
  • Ability to interpret normative principles of planning law for socially and environmentally sensitive decision making .
Module Content

Planning laws and the legitimacy of planning activity. Values and the normative nature of planning legislation; Ideologies of planning law. The legacy of apartheid spatial legislation; Emerging statutory framework and processes for planning in South Africa: the Development Facilitation Act, Municipal Systems Act, Wise Land use Bill and those relating to transport, environment, land reform and water. Development control, development management and facilitation in South Africa, concepts; tools; the planning process. Principles and sub-principles for land development. Principles for Decision Making and Conflict Resolution.

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URP 3546 : Urban Design Studio
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 2542
Core-requisites
URP 3541 and URP 3542
Assessments

1.Continous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests
  • Group Assignments and
  • Practical Studio Design and Technical Report
  • and Oral Presentations

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to:

  • Investigate, analyze, synthesize planning themes in order to contribute to the preparation of plans.
  • Develop an environmentally sensitive orientation.
  • Appreciate efficiency in resource use.
  • Grasp principles of environmental design and how they apply to mew development and redevelopment projects.
  • Develop concept and detailed design skills.
  • Prepare technically accurate plans and socially sensitive and relevant proposals.
  • Understand and act within professional ethics
Module Content

Intensive studio, addressing both new and redevelopment planning design at community and higher scale. A problem based exploration involving studio seminars, consultation and critiques that integrate design elements that provide socially viable and economically sustainable communities with a sense of place.

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URP 3646: Research Methods for Planners
Status
Compulsory module for all B.URP students
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 tutorial hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 2643
Core-requisites
URP 3642
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests
  • Group Assignments and
  • Studios

2. Oral and Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to;

  • Appreciate the role/use of collecting, analysis, organization and critical evaluation of information.
  • Understand and creatively apply theoretical knowledge of the natural and built environments, social, economic, political and developmental environments to the design and management of planned interventions.
  • Cherish the diversity of views and ideologies.
  • Understand and act within professional ethics.
Module Content

Provision of an understanding of approaches to qualitative and quantitative research methods in the social sciences and in particular planning. Logic of social research methods related to planning and including analysis of demographic economic, economic land use and transportation data.

Approaches to research design, proposal writing; setting of goals, objectives and research hypothesis and design of methodology. Techniques of data collection, analysis and presentation; Review of research instruments: interviews, questionnaire preparation, coding and administration; land use surveys. Library research essay writing. Presentation techniques.

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URP 4740: Supervised Research Project
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
40 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3643
Core-requisites
All first semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on:

  • (I) Individual linked assignments
  • (ii) Oral presentations (seminars)

2. Oral defense of the final dissertation/supervised research

3. Written submission of the final supervised dissertation / research.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to:

  • Collect quantitative and qualitative data, analyze, order and critically evaluate planning information at various levels from supervised scientific research.
  • Link knowledge to policies and spatial plans.
  • Synthesize and apply theoretical and conceptual planning knowledge to action.
  • Make presentation of dissertation and assignments, and projects,etc.
Module Content

Project identification; proposal writing; problem identification; theoretical framework; project objectives; project methodology; field reconnaissance. Information gathering; primary and secondary data; surveys of people and objects; preliminary analysis; classifications and forecasting. Models; predictive and evaluative. Plan Design; Evaluation;. partial evaluation techniques; financial appraisal; cost-effectiveness analysis. Dissertation writing and submission.

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URP 4561: Intergrated Development Studies
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practicals / Tutorial Hours
1 contact hour per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3543
Core-requisites
All first semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on:

  • (i) Individual assignments or
  • (ii) Group assignments
  • (iii) Prescribed studio output and report.
  • (iv) Oral presentation.

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to act within the moral and ethical framework of planning in terms of:

  • Investigate, analyse and synthesize planning themes in order to contribute to preparation of realistic plans.
  • Link planning proposals to institutional development processes .
  • Invoke appropriate participatory processes with stakeholders and communities.
  • Infuse appropriate monitoring and evaluation mechanisms in plan preparation.
  • Set targets and realistic budgets for project management.
  • Grasp the notion of integration in planning activity.
  • Develop an environmentally sensitive orientation.
  • Understand and act within professional ethics.
Module Content

Approaches to integrated development planning. Characteristics and objectives of IDP and effectiveness as articulated within the South African context. Strategies for linking key sectors such as employment, land use, transportation, local economic development (LED) and environment. Overview of the unique planning and development dimensions of small communities in/and rural regions. Role of small towns in development; typologies of small towns: (resource frontier towns, limited resource bases, etc). Local economic development/facilitation in small towns; Strategies for small town regeneration and sustainable growth and development; Institutional arrangements for LED in S A. Urban Redevelopment and ISRDP as local level IDP.

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URP 4562: Professional Planning Practice and Ethics
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3542
Core-requisites
All first semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual Assignments or
  • Group Assignments and
  • A written report.
  • Oral presentation.

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to act within the moral and ethical framework of planning in terms of:

  • Social justice and equal opportunity.
  • Appreciate efficiency in resource use.
  • Develop an environmentally sensitive orientation.
  • Understand and act within professional ethics.
  • Run a planning office efficiently .
  • Apply knowledge of political and institutional context of planning to a given situation.
Module Content

The course examines the practice and theory aspects of current concern to the planning profession. It examines the evolution of the planning profession, the concept of professionalism, professional ethics; practice in both public and public sectors. Running a professional planning office: budgeting, staffing & tendering; responsibility to the public, to the profession, to client, the employer and the social sciences. The emerging statutory, administrative and institutional framework for land development and management; role of central, provincial and local government; planning commissions and development tribunals. Public participation; EIA. Role of the planner (manager/facilitator/advocate).
The evolving development planning framework.

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URP 4563: Transportation and Energy Planning
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3543
Core-requisites
All second semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on;

  • (i) Individual Assignments
  • (ii) Tests
  • (iii) Group Assignments and
  • (iv) Oral project / seminar presentation

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to:

  • To undertake investigations, analysis and design of homes, work places, mobility and transport modes (including their integration) with energy efficiency, reduction of friction and the environment in mind;
  • Contribute to the preparation and design of plans, formulation of policies touching on Energy use, Mobility, Transportation and Land use within the community .
  • Understand the synergy between Land uses and Transportation; various transport modes and their efficiency (cost, energy use, etc.
  • Be sensitive to the location of land uses (and its density) and impacts on the environment;
  • Appreciate efficiency in energy uses in all its ramifications (home, work, etc).
Module Content

Sources of energy, renewable and non-renewable energy; Conservation and management strategies of renewable and non-renewable resources. Impacts of energy (and planning) on the environment, land use, transportation, socio-economy, political and life styles; ozone depletion; global warming. Energy wastes, solid and toxic wastes. EIA in the energy and transportation sectors. Basic principles and techniques in the planning and management of public transportation systems. Data requirements in transportation planning; evaluation of transportation alternatives and the decision-making process. Travel demand and supply analysis (trip generation, distribution, assignment and modal split). Cost and capacity relationships of all modes; relationship between land use and transportation. Rural transport systems.

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URP 4564: Discourses in Urban and Regional Planning Theory
Status
Compulsory core departmental module for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3542
Core-requisites
All first semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on;

  • (i) Individual Assignments
  • (ii) Tests
  • (iii) Group Assignments and
  • (iv) Seminar Presentations

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of the module, students should be able to;

  • Understand and creatively apply theoretical knowledge of the natural and built environments, social, economic, political and developmental environments to the design and management of planned interventions.
  • Appreciate the diversity of views and ideologies .
  • Link robust theoretical debate and evaluate their influences to planning practice.
  • Understand and act within professional ethics.
Module Content

Review of intellectual and political underpinnings of contemporary planning theories. Paradigm epochal shifts in planning research and practice. Modernist Versus post-modernism/post-fordism; new frontiers/debates in planning. Is there any need for theory in planning – the theory/practice chasm/ nexus. Academics / Practitioners? Ideology and planning. How have regional planning theories influences regional development practices and regional development. Theoretical underpinnings of selected regional planning/development strategies (development nodes, ISRDPs, growth centre policy, SDIs, IDZ, river basin management, decentralisation, trans-frontier parks, etc). Evaluation of institutional and jurisdictional setting for regional planning (SACU, SADC; NEPAD, ECOWAS, EC, NAFTA, etc). The future of regional planning.


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URP 4661: Case Studies in Sustainable Settlement Planning
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3541
Core-requisites
All second semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous assessment based on;

  • Individual Assignments
  • Tests
  • Group Assignments and
  • Seminar Presentations

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module students should be able to;

  • To investigate, analyze, synthesize planning themes in order to contribute to the preparation of plans.
  • Develop an environmentally sensitive orientation.
  • Appreciate principles responsible for successful best practice cases in sustainable settlement planning.
  • Adapt best practice cases to improving settlement planning practice in South Africa.
  • Identify internet sites for research into all aspects of integrated and sustainable settlement planning.
  • Grasp the notion of integration and sustainability in planning .
  • Understand and act within professional ethics.
Module Content

Concepts of sustainable development and sustainable settlement planning; priorities for development, conditions for sustainable development (economic, ecology etc.). Creating sustainable livelihood and implications for political ecology and economy for resource allocation. Sustainable cities case studies. Smart cities and new urbanism. Urban renewal and regeneration, cluster development and place marketing. Principles for creating sustainable places. operational principles for sustainable development; restoration ecology. Best case studies. Tourism, the tourism industry. The essential components of eco-tourism, natural base, infrastructure, economic relationships. Reconciling human and wildlife/parks conflicts; community-based initiatives. Laws of conservation of endangered and threatened species and ecosystems. Traditional / cultural properties. Heritage landscapes types; traditional cultural values in preservation planning, IKS; Procedures for National Register Nomination; Consideration, documentation, protection and monitoring of heritage sites.

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URP 4662: Key Issues in Contemporary Planning
Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 3641, URP 3642.
Core-requisites
All first semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on:

  • Individual assignments
  • Tests
  • Group assignments and
  • Seminar presentations

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to show evidence of an awareness of:

  • Social justice and equal opportunity, gender sensitivity.
  • Planning as interventions/actions of mediation, arbitration and conflict resolution.
  • The synergy between environment impact assessment and planning.
  • Understand EIA, its legislation and act within professional ethics.
Module Content

Planning as mediation, arbitration and resolution of conflicts in resource allocation and usage. Levels of participation, (including Arnstein's ladder of planning participation). Techniques of and case studies in participation, mediation and conflict resolution. Gender: concept definitions; history of gender issues; local and international. Concept of gender and development. Gender analytical tools and framework. Empowerment framework: information, access, participation, control, culturally determined gender roles and environmental conservation in selected parts of the world. Examination and comparative analysis of specific planning themes and issues (development management, informal housing and employment, urban sprawl, rural land use, planning institutions, change of land use in SADC countries. EIA as a management tool; basic concepts; preliminary activities; impact identification (scoping); baseline study; impact evaluation (quantification); mitigation measures; assessment; documentation; decision making; post auditing; falsehoods surrounding EIA; problems and solutions of EIA; institutional arrangements.


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URP 4663: Project Design and Management
Status
Compulsory to all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Practical / Tutorial
1 contact hour per week
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
All Compulsory 3 rd year B.URP modules.
Core-requisites
All Compulsory 1 st Semester 4 th year B.URP modules.
Assessments

1. Continuous assessment based on

  • (i) Individual assignments,
  • (ii) Tests and
  • (iii) Group Assignments.

2. A written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to understand and apply the following:

  • (i) Identify development needs.
  • (ii) Design development programs or projects.
  • (iii) Understand what a project cycle is and how to implement development programs or projects.
  • (iv) Monitor and control development resources and
  • (v) Evaluate programs and project outcomes.
Module Content

Project identification and principles of project design implementation monitoring and feedback. Preparing an offer of service and reinterpretation of client mandates, tendering procedures for projects, Pre-qualification, costing of projects. Creating demand, client relations, and professional ethics. Designing a project, do's and don'ts. Contract administration and financial procedures, penalties, retention and insurance.


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URP 4664: Housing Studio

Status
Compulsory for all B.URP students.
Instructional Hours
4 contact hours per week.
Credit Weight
16 credits.
Prerequisites
URP 4543
Core-requisites
All first semester modules for the fourth year of study.
Assessments

1.Continuous Assessment based on;

  • Individual assignments
  • Tests
  • Group assignments and
  • Studio presentations and report

2. Written Semester Examination.

Module Outcomes

By the end of this module, students should be able to;

  • Understand the provision of housing through the price system.
  • Housing policy frameworks for different housing markets.
  • Economics of rent control and other tenure system .
  • Impact of rent control and housing subsidies.
  • Collect, analyze, synthesize and evaluate of information on property development in order to contribute to preparation of plans.
  • Understand the interaction between informal and formal processes of housing supply.
Module Content

Theory of housing; evolution of housing prototypes. Housing and land use in rural and urban areas. Formal and informal housing; shelter and poverty. Housing delivery systems. Housing quality and affordability. Land tenure systems. Housing policies and strategies; the urban housing market. interaction between informal and formal processes of housing supply. The myth of home-ownership and the reality of housing tenancy. Urban housing development and design processes.

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The following is a list of staff members in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning:

Designation Staff memeber Contact Details

Matthew Dayomi, Professor

Tel: +27 15 962 8585
Cell: +27 (0) 83 343 4151
Email:
dayomi@univen.ac.za

Oscar Musandu-Nyamayaro,
Senior Lecturer

Tel: +27 15 962 8584
Cell: +27 (0) 82 413 7423
Email:
oskam@univen.ac.za

James Chakwizira , Lecturer

Tel: + 27 15 962 8592
Cell: +27 (0)76 38 77 814
Email: jameschakwizira@yahoo.com

Victor Mushiana, Technician

Tel:
Cell:
Email:

Prof. Syagga

Tel:
Cell:
Email:

Mr. M. Makumule

Tel:
Cell:
Email: